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Behaviourist Theory

Language Development

Behaviourist Theory

  • The Behavioural Theory relates to nurtures influence on language development because it uses environment renforcers to explain how children's language is acquired, and how it evolves into the correct form used by society.

Behaviorist theory Is a collection of three perspectives:

 

  • Behaviorism- behavior such as the production of language is based on observations of the use of language in the childs environment and that it develops continuously, not in stages

 

  • Classical conditioning is the act of presenting two stimuli together as one that the child is familiar with, such as an object the child sees regularly. For example: a round, sphere shaped object, and another unfamiliar stimuli such as the word "ball". If this process is repeated multiple times, eventually the child should make the connection that a round, sphere shaped object is a ball.

 

  • Operant conditioning runs on a reward and punishment basis. For example: If a child sees a cat and says, "cat" the child should be rewarded for correctly identifing a cat. This can be done through verbal praise, or in the form of a treat. However, if a child sees a cat and says, "dog" the child would be corrected of his mistake, not given a treat, and probably told that it is not a dog, it is a cat.

 

  • The Behavioural Theory relates to nurtures influence on language development, because it uses environmental renforcers to explain how a child's language is acquired, and how it evolves into the correct form used by society